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These following quotations are from the New York Times at: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/arts/design/martin-luther-king-jr-nat…

“He [MLK Jr] was thinking global. It had become clear to him that racism was not a stand-alone evil. It was an organic element in a disease complex that included capitalism, colonialism and militarism. In 1965, in a break with his assigned public role fighting racism Dr. King spoke out against the war in Vietnam. It confused supporters and earned him vindictive enemies. By the time he checked into Room 306, he was, for good reason, feeling vulnerable and fatalistic. He had been to the mountaintop; but he had hit some valleys too…

To idealists of the 21st century, it may seem that on many social, economic and ethical fronts the country has come to what seems a futureless halt, just as the museum’s civil rights story does. But rather than exit the scene in weariness or frustration, we would do well to go back in time. If we stay alert, we can find instruction there.

The emphasis of the present-day protest movements is on inclusion: equal salaries, equal education, the right to marry. The goal is to get a share in the system. The civil rights movement began with that goal too, then realized that the system was the problem. Dr. King eventually came to this conviction, and in some ways it made the end of his life hard, complicated and unsettled…

Other people, however, held that view all along, and many of them were women. Sexism was rampant within the movement leadership. Women were expected to make coffee, make nice and stay home. Some, like Ella Baker, a tireless civil rights organizer, refused. True monuments have yet to be raised to enough of these women. One, Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977), was a monument herself….




Source: Stopracism.ca